Lykhny Uprising, or translation-difficulties: what happened in 1866

  • History
Abkhazians who took part in the 1866 Lykhny rebellion. Photo by Dmitri Yermakov (1846-1916).

Badrak Avidzba (Sputnik) -- On 26 July 1866, a popular gathering in the village of Lykhny grew into an uprising known as the Lykhny Uprising.

On the eve of the 155th anniversary of the beginning of the Lykhny Uprising of 1866, the Abkhazian historian Soslan Salakaya told Sputnik about the preconditions of the popular uprising and its consequences.

Read more: Lykhny Uprising, or translation-difficulties: what happened in 1866

Abkhazia and The Caucasian War: 1810-1864, by George Anchabadze

  • History

George Anchabadze (Achba) 
Professor of history at the Ilia State University, Georgia.

The Caucasian War is the longest-running military conflict in Russian history. One of its features is the absence of generally accepted chronological boundaries. Moreover, if almost all historians recognize 1864 as the final date of this conflict, then there is a wide range of opinions regarding the initial date - 1722, 1763, 1785, 1801, 1817, 1830 and other years. Each of these dates has its own more or less justifiable motives, but the most reasonable is the opinion of historians who attribute the beginning of the great confrontation in the North Caucasus to the era of the Russian Empress Catherine II (1762-1796), when the active advance of the Russian troops and administration began here.

Read more: Abkhazia and The Caucasian War: 1810-1864, by George Anchabadze

A speech from the representative of Abkhazia Tumanov at a meeting of the Union Council (Parliament), Mountain Republic

  • History
Delegates of the First Congress of the Union of the Mountaineers of the North Caucasus and Dagestan. (1917).

Translation

21 January 1919

Temir-Khan-Shura

I am happy on this great historic day for us the mountaineers of the Caucasus. I am a member of the government of your related-by-blood, fraternal Abkhazian people, and offer greetings on behalf of the entire Abkhazian people to the members of the Union Council, as the supreme body uniting the ravaged and oppressed mountain-peoples of the North Caucasus.

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The Spread of Christianity in the Eastern Black Sea Littoral (Written and Archaeological Sources), by L. G. Khrushkova

  • History
Tsandripsh: The church in Abazgia, built under Justinian I.

Journal: Ancient West & East Volume: 6  Date: 2007 Pages: 177-219

This article presents a brief summary of the literary and archaeological evidence for the spread and consolidation of Christianity in the eastern Black Sea littoral during the early Christian era (4th-7th centuries AD). Colchis is one of the regions of the late antique world for which the archaeological evidence of Christianisation is greater and more varied than the literary. Developments during the past decade in the field of early Christian archaeology now enable this process to be described in considerably greater detail.

Read more: The Spread of Christianity in the Eastern Black Sea Littoral (Written and Archaeological Sources),...

Contrary to the will of the people: how the S[oviet] S[ocialist] R[republic] of Abkhazia became an autonomy within Georgia

  • History
From the book: Trans-Caucasia by Harold Buxton (1926)

On 19 February 1931, at the VI Pan-Georgian Congress of Soviets, a resolution was adopted on the transformation of the "Treaty" SSR of Abkhazia into an autonomous republic within the Georgian SSR.

The decision on the entry of Soviet Abkhazia as an autonomous member of the GSSR was made at the III Session of the Central Executive Committee of Abkhazia and approved by the popularly elected supreme authority of the Abkhazian state - the VI Congress of Soviets of Abkhazia, held on 11 February 1931.

Read more: Contrary to the will of the people: how the S[oviet] S[ocialist] R[republic] of Abkhazia became an...

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